Rebecca Nesvet

Rae X. Yan

James Malcolm Rymer M. J. Errym

Nana Sahib

Light of my Eyes

Terror of the World

Lord of the World

Light of my Earth

King of Delhi

Major George Fletcher

The husband of Annie Fletcher. Believed to be stationed in Cawnpore.

Bessie Hope

Sister of Annie Fletcher. Loves Jeffur Ahib. Jessie later comments that Hope is a good Scotch name.

Mrs. Annie Hope Fletcher

Sister of Bessie Hope. Wife of George Fletcher, with who, she has a child.

Prince Jeffur Ahib

Young Mountain Chief

Indian chieftan of the Dooctee hill tribe from 'the mountains'. Loves Bessie Hope. Implicitly Muslim. The British characters see him as light-skinned in comparison to the Hindus.

Lieutenant Adrian

Cousin to Major Fletcher. Unrequited attachment to Bessie Hope

Loll Tall

Works for Nana Sahib. "Loll" (lal) is an honorific.

Dennis the Irishman

An ethnic caricature; speaks in dialect and defers to his Scottish comrade Sandy M'Laren. Compare with the Irish fighter Cassidy in Dion Boucicault's 1858 play "Jessie Brown."

Sergeant Sandy M'Laren the Highlander

An ethnic caricature; speaks in dialect and has an Irish sidekick, Dennis. Compare with the Scottish fighter Sweenie Jones in Dion Boucicault's 1858 play Jessie Brown. A major difference is that Sweenie is the fiance of Jessie Brown.

Gab Ali

Soldier of the Nana's crew.

Highland Jessie Campbell

First appears in the April 10th issue, a Scottish girl described thus: "a young and frank-looking girl of some twenty years of age--her face pale with anxiety, but a look of courage and determination in her blue eyes that was a joy to see--brought a soldier's musket to the charge and stood resolutely on the defensive. Her dress was picturesque, for she wore a foraging cap with a gold band and tassel, from beneath which, in long wavy masses, escaped her fair hair, which was of that beautiful colour called golden in the north, and upon which the light from the Hindoo's torch shone as if there were literally threads of gold interwoven among it. A scarf of tartan was wound tightly about her, and set off her fine figure to advantage. Her atititude combined grace with dignity; and there was a chivalric courage about her, as she there stood with the musket at the charge, and the bayonet gleaming in the flickering light from the Hindoo's torch, that would have won the admiration of a painter." Jessie reveals that she is the daughter of a soldier. She in in love with Donald.

Originally, a pseudohistorical character well known in late 1857 and throughout 1858. A fraudulent 'letter to the Editor', printed in several British, Irish, and American newspapers claimed that this fiancee or wife of a Highlander fighting in India had clairvoyantly predicted Havelock's capture of Lucknow from the Sepoys. The story was rapidly discredited, but informed many imaginative representations, including Rymer's penny dreadful and Dion Boucicault's play Highland Jessie, which opened in New York's Wallack Theatre in February 1858; the month of Rymer's serial's first instalment's publication.

Mr. Vernon Hawkins

Patriarch of the Hawkins family. Works for the East India Company. Possibly, his surname is intended to suggest the English pirate Francis Hawkins

Captain Hannibal Hawkins

Son of Vernon Hawkins. Older brother of Caesar Hawkins. Rapidly rising in the army at time of revolt. Initially a ruthless colonist, changes somewhat after he falls in love with an Indian Muslim princess, Zeelook. Possibly, his surname is intended to suggest the English pirate Francis Hawkins.

Caesar Hawkins

Works in civil service as collector in Delhi. Possibly, his surname is intended to suggest the English pirate Francis Hawkins

Miss Volumina Hawkins

Only daughter of Vernon Hawkins. Brothers are Hannibal Hawkins and Caesar Hawkins. Possibly, her surname is intended to suggest the English pirate Francis Hawkins. Her forename may be a misspelling of the Roman Republican matron Volumnia, heroine of Shakespeare's Coriolanus. Like Volumnia, Volumina behaves as a Stoic matron--eventually.

Mr. Hope

Father of Bessie and Annie Hope. Friend of Mr. Hawkins. Worked in civil service, died a few years before the events of the story.

Mrs. Hope

Mother of Bessie and Annie Hope. Wife of Mr. Hope.

Mrs. Hawkins

Matriarch of the Hawkins family. Wife of Mr. Hawkins.

Mr. Bonus

Uncle of Mrs. Hawkins.

Miss Flint

"The Hon. Miss Flint" is anything but honorable. A broad, often cruel caricature, this woman has come to India in search o a British husband. Vain, petty, acquisitive, deceitful, and self-deceiving, she constantly brags about the "offers" (of marriage) she has allegedly received back in the British Isles. There are several suggestions that these 'offers' are misprisions of casual conversation or wholly made up. She fishes for an 'offer' from one or more of the Hawkins brothers, who find her repugnant. Her age (late thirties) and pretensions to being a heroine incur a great deal of mockery, and she is jealous of the true heroines Bessie Hope and Zeelook.

Mr. Bonus

Uncle of Mrs. Hawkins.

Hooder Ali

Appears in March 20th issue as one of the Sepoys attempting to find the Hawkins and Hope families as they hide in the quarry.

Sahib Akbar Ai

Appears in March 20th issue as one of the Sepoys attempting to find the Hawkins and Hope families as they hide in the quarry.

Colonel Hood

Appears in March 27th issue as one of the British troops that arrive to save the Hopes and Hawkins.

Major Holmes

Appears in March 27th issue as one of the British troops that arrive to save the Hopes and Hawkins.

General Wheeler

Appears in March 27th issue as one of the British troops that arrive to save the Hopes and Hawkins.

Captain Harris

Appears in March 27th issue as one of the British troops that arrive to save the Hopes and Hawkins.

Hopkins

Appears in March 27th issue as one of the British troops that arrive to save the Hopes and Hawkins. He dies from an arrow wound to the throat.

Zeelook

An Indian girl of high birth. She is Muslim and falls in love with Hannibal Hawkins and becomes a friend to Bessie Hope. In many ways, a female double of Jeffur Ahib. Like him, she is represented as lighter-complexioned and more pious, humane, and eloquent than the Hindu majority population. As a heroine, she saves her hero, Hannibal, and also plays an active role in the salvation of the party of refugees. Her name might be a corruption of Zuleika (Persian for 'beauty').

Wootton

Appears in April 10th issue, a cavalry soldier that is fighting alongside Jessie.

Colonel Hargrave

Appears in April 10th issue, a wounded officer that is fighting alongside Jessie. Injured, he is propped up in a hay wagon.

Donald

First mentioned in April 10th issue, Jessie's lover.

Colonel Lane

Mentioned in April 10th issue, a wounded cavalry officer in the cart.

Rao Patan

Mentioned in April 10th issue as the father of a small child found in the loft of a hut to which Jessie Campbell, Annie Fletcher, and Bessie Hope flee. Rao is usually the title of the royal family associated with the city of Patan in the Indian state of Rajasthan.

Aza

Mentioned in April 10th issue as a small child found in the loft of a hut to which Jessie Campbell, Annie Fletcher, and Bessie Hope flee. Rao is usually the title of the royal family associated with the city of Patan in the Indian state of Rajasthan.

Major General Henry Havelock

Durham Lucknow

Most famous for his 'too little, too late' (as Neil Hultgren has discussed) relief of Lucknow, he died almost immediately afterward, of dysentery.

Governor General Earl of Dalhousie James Broun-Ramsay Dalhousie Castle Dalhousie Castle

The youngest Governor-General of India, a Peelite Tory. Responsible for the suppression of the revolt in the Punjab and, in 1849, the Raj's conquest of the Punjab.

the Prophet Muhammad

ca. 500 Mecca Medina

Hindu (mostly) and Muslim Indians took part in the revolt. Possibly, Rymer's Sepoys' invocation of the Prophet connects this revolt with the Anglo-Mysore Wars of the late eighteenth century, wherein the Muslim Indian rulers Haider Ali (d. 1782) and his son and successor Tipu Sultan (d. 1799) resisted the British conquest of India. Rymer's most famous work, The String of Pearls (1846-7), takes place in the immediate aftermath of the Anglo-Mysore Wars, and features several characters in the 'Indian army' (East India Company forces) of that era.